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Each season we choose an Ypsi Family Read book we hope everyone will read. This year we don’t yet know if it will be safe to have an in-person celebration, but if not, be sure we’ll provide plenty of fun, hands-on activity ideas you can engage in as a family from home to prompt conversations. And watch for more Zoom Family Town Halls like the one we’re having August 1 and maybe a virtual author visit depending on the book you help choose!

Based on current events, social justice, and our desire to share the latest fiction from a diverse group of authors from their #ownvoices, we narrowed our list for the fall to five titles. Help us decide which book will be the Fall 2020 Family Read. Click the button to the right to tell us which book sounds like the one you most want to read.

SUMMER CHALLENGE SECRET CODE

BOOKBALLOT

Look Both Ways

by Jason Reynolds

Other Words for Home

by Jessica Warga

Amina’s Voice

by Hana Khan

A Good Kind of Trouble

by Lisa Moore Ramée

New Kid

by Jerry Craft

The Book:

Jason Reynolds conjures ten tales (one per block) about what happens after the dismissal bell rings, and brilliantly weaves them into one wickedly funny, piercingly poignant look at the detours we face on the walk home, and in life.

The Book:

Jude never thought she’d be leaving her beloved older brother and father behind in Syria. But when things in her hometown become volatile, Jude and her mother are sent to live in Cincinnati with relatives. This life brings unexpected surprises, but maybe America, too, is a place where Jude can be seen as she really is.

The Book:

Amina’s Voice brings to life the joys and challenges of a young Pakistani-American and highlights the many ways in which one girl’s voice can help bring a diverse community together to love and support each other.

The Book:

Tensions are high over the trial of a police officer who shot an unarmed Black man. When the officer is set free, and Shay goes with her family to a silent protest, she starts to see that some trouble is worth making. 

The Book:

Seventh grader Jordan Banks loves nothing more than drawing cartoons about his life. But instead of sending him to the art school of his dreams, his parents enroll him in a prestigious private school known for its academics, where Jordan is one of the few kids of color in his entire grade.